Corona Car Accident Facts About Pile-Ups

Accidents involving three or more cars are referred to as car pile-ups or chain reaction accidents. They are very dangerous because a car may absorb multiple impacts each of which can cause serious harm and damage. During these multiple impacts, a car may get hit from several angles including from the side where the passengers have the least protection. Because several cars are involved, determining fault in a chain reaction Corona car accident can be a very complex process.

Chain reaction accidents often happen because of poor driving conditions caused by bad weather. However, pile-ups can also occur when driving conditions are ideal because motorists tend to drive more aggressively and at higher speeds.

Causes Of Car Pile-Ups

The most common reasons for this type of accident are inattention, driving too close to the car in front and failing to compensate for poor driving conditions. When a driver is not paying attention, there is little or no time to react to a sudden slowdown of the traffic ahead because the driver fails to detect it quickly enough. Reduced reaction time also results from following a car too closely.

Factors that contribute to the occurrence of car pile-ups include:

  • Poor visibility caused by fog, snow, smoke, dust, and rain.
  • Poor road conditions caused by the weather, road construction, and poor road maintenance.
  • Mechanical deficiencies such as worn brake pads, under inflated tires, and burned-out brake lights.
  • Impaired judgment and reaction time due to intoxication or drowsiness.

Types Of Car Pile-Ups

A car pile-up can be initiated by a vehicle traveling at high speed that collides into cars stopped at an intersection from behind. This causes cars at the rear to successively push up against the cars in front. Alternatively, a chain of moving cars can pile up when the lead car collides into a stopped or slow moving car.

There are many variations to the above types of pile-ups. In a chain of three cars, the third car can collide with the second car which gets pushed into the first car. Another variation of this is when the second car collides with the first car which is followed by the third car colliding with the second car.

Determining Fault

Determining fault in car pile-ups can be very complex, especially in those involving many cars. In the three car example above, when the third car initiates the pileup by striking the second car which in turn gets pushed into the first, the third car is likely to be found at fault. On the other hand, if the second car strikes the first car and this is followed by the third car striking the second car, fault will probably be found with the second and third cars.

How To Avoid Car Pile-Ups

Alert and defensive driving is your best strategy to avoid this type of accident. This means allowing enough space between you and the car in front of you so that there is plenty of time to slow down without violent braking. This distance must be increased when road conditions are poor. Avoiding a pileup means not colliding with the car in front as well as not being hit by the car behind you.

If you have been involved in a chain reaction accident, Silverthorne Attorneys can help. Our experienced attorneys will get you the compensation you deserve. Contact us today for more information.

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