Dog Bites – Part III : Do You Have a Case?

Something to consider when you have been bitten by a dog is whether or not you have a case? And if you have a case, is it a good case? A good case is one that has three elements that include the following:

  1. Liability on the part of the defendant
  2. Insurance coverage
  3. Injury that deserves significant compensation

 

The first element is whether or not the law makes someone (the defendant) liable for the incident. If you are in a state where there is a strict liability law, then the answer is definitely yes!

The second element has to do with whether the owner of the dog – the person who is liable – is covered by insurance. Insurance is important for two reasons: the first reason means that there will be money available to pay the victim for any damages – be they medical bills that included surgery, medications, lost wages, etc. The second reason is the victim can retain an attorney on a contingency fee basis – which means that attorneys who handle dog bite cases usually do not ask for payment until the case is settled and money is recovered – on the other hand, if there is no insurance, it is rare that a victim can retain a lawyer because of the probability that fees will not be adequately dispersed to the lawyer or the victim.

The final element has to do with whether or not the injury is something that deserved significant compensation. This is usually determined on a case-by-case basis. It is up to the victim and their attorney to provide enough supporting evidence that states that there is need for compensation. Which is why it is so important to take pictures after the incident and to go see a doctor to report any issues.

In order for a victim to receive fair and just compensation for their injuries, they need an experienced lawyer who has dealt with dog bite cases in the past. There is no downside to discussing a case with an attorney who has the experience, knowledge, and overall desire to help the victim receive adequate compensation without too much effort, stress, or harm. The first consultation is always free!

2 Comments

  1. Derek Mcdoogle December 8, 2016
    • Ian Silverthorne March 15, 2017

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